Curriculum

Explore our Curriculum

HOPKINS' COURSE OFFERINGS are traditional in structure, with academic departments assuming responsibility for curriculum and pedagogy. Taken as a whole, the Hopkins curriculum provides a solid foundation in academic disciplines, broad exposure to the liberal arts, and selective opportunities to pursue individual interests. While always accepting the value of student-centered learning, the School embraces a variety of approaches to teaching and content, from a traditional lecture and discussion format to a range of more experiential approaches. Graduation requirements qualify students for admission to the full range of colleges and universities.

Purposes and Values

In 1660, Edward Hopkins, the second governor of the Connecticut Colony, established our nation’s first charitable trust to found Hopkins Grammar School on the New Haven Green. The School began with a dedication to the “breeding up of hopeful youths... for the public service of the country in future times.” More than three centuries later, Hopkins School continues to fulfill its original mission, and “hopeful”—connoting both the promise and the expectation of future good—remains the word that defines our educational approach and animates our aspirations.
 
Today, Hopkins is a traditional, independent, coeducational day school of 684 students in grades seven through twelve. Located on a 108-acre campus overlooking New Haven, the School takes pride in its distinguished faculty and dedicated staff. We define ourselves as a community of civility and learning, one that educates students from diverse backgrounds to a full measure of their talents and humanity. Together, we seek to: 
  • develop in our young people the habits of mind of scholars as the foundation for a lifelong love of learning;
  • foster the courage to live and think as distinct individuals who embrace their responsibilities in the larger world;
  • expose every student to the deep satisfaction that derives from service to others;
  • enlarge the educational experience to include the creative joy and aesthetic sensibility of the artist, and the vitality and competitive spirit of the athlete;
  • provide, through the School’s advisers, the wisdom and goodwill necessary to guide our young people to confident self-reliance; and,
  • nurture the development of character essential to leading a rich and purposeful life.

Academic Honesty

Honesty promotes learning; dishonesty interferes with it. Hence, Hopkins seeks to provide an atmosphere in which principles of honesty guide students’ efforts and work. Students should submit work that is wholly and truly their own; otherwise they lose the opportunity to learn for themselves and to learn from their mistakes. All students will include the statement, “I pledge my honor,” and sign their names to every piece of graded work. At the beginning of the year, each student reads and signs the School’s Statement of Academic Honesty in a special adviser meeting, and each academic department instructs students in the policies, expectations, and guidelines specific to its discipline.