Academics

Explore our Curriculum

Computer Science

As part of its educational program, Hopkins incorporates computing and technology tools into the curriculum at various grade levels and across disciplines. The objective is to provide and ensure a basic level of knowledge, understanding, and skills with current technology, appropriate for each course at each grade level. Many teachers also incorporate assignments into non-computer science courses which strengthen students’ abilities to grasp various coding or software concepts.

The following computer science courses are designed to help students develop an understanding of coding basics and computer science concepts. Students establish and refine the problem solving skills required to succeed in the ever changing world of technology, working with foundational skills that will continue to be relevant as new languages and platforms evolve. Independent work and student exploration are the focus, and program development is central to student learning.
  • AP® Computer Science Principles

    Grades 11–12. 1 credit.

    This course serves as a broad introduction to computer science and the art of programming. Students learn how to think algorithmically and solve problems efficiently while being challenged to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. Topics include abstraction, algorithms, data structures, encapsulation, resource management, security, software engineering and web development. Languages include C, PHP, and JavaScript plus SQL, CSS and HTML. Problem sets and projects may be inspired by biology, cryptography, finance, forensics, gaming, and other fields. This is a rigorous course designed for students with or without prior programming experience and prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles examination. (Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and departmental approval. No prior experience with programming is expected.)

    *AP®, Advanced Placement®, and SAT® are registered trademarks of the College Board. Used with permission.
  • AP® Computer Science Principles

    Grades 11–12. 1 credit.

    This course serves as a broad introduction to computer science and the art of programming. Students learn how to think algorithmically and solve problems efficiently while being challenged to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. Topics include abstraction, algorithms, data structures, data storage, resource management, security, software engineering and web development. Languages include C and Python, plus SQL, CSS and HTML. Problem sets and projects may be inspired by biology, cryptography, finance, forensics, gaming, and other fields. This is a rigorous course designed for students with or without prior programming experience, and it prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles examination. (Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and departmental approval. No prior experience with programming is expected.)

    *AP®, Advanced Placement®, and SAT® are registered trademarks of the College Board. Used with permission.
  • Introduction to Programming (T1)

    Grades 9–12. Term I or Term II, ½ credit.

    This course is designed to serve as a first course in computer science for students with no prior computing experience. The course concentrates on programming in a modern programming language which prepares students to use computers to solve real-world problems. Themes include logic, problem-solving through algorithm design, efficiency, and user interaction. Topics in structured programming include variable declarations, data types, conditionals, loops, arrays, and functions. The course emphasizes problem solving and application development.
  • Introduction to Programming (T2)

    Grades 10–12. Term II, ½ credit.

    This course is designed to serve as a first course in computer science for students with no prior computing experience. The course concentrates on programming in a modern programming language, which prepares students to use computers to solve real-world problems. Themes include data structures, logic, problem-solving through algorithm design, efficiency and user interaction. Topics in structured programming include variable declarations, data types, conditionals, loops, arrays and functions. The course emphasizes problem solving across various disciplines within the Hopkins curriculum.
  • Topics In Programming T1

    Grades 9–12. Term I or Term II, ½ credit.

    This course offers students an opportunity to continue learning computer programming through instructor and student-designed projects. Students may build their projects using a variety of programming languages and technologies. Topics may include web applications, advanced algorithms, computer graphics, app development, generative art, cryptography, artificial intelligence, machine learning and other topics according to student interest and instructor approval. (Prerequisite: Introduction to Programming, AP Computer Science Principles, or departmental approval)
  • Web Design

    Grades 9–12. Term II, ½ credit.

    Web design is an interdisciplinary process that combines art and technology. Students learn the basic skills necessary to create and code a functional and aesthetically-minded website that serves a purpose. These include specific methods for collecting content, applying principles of design to structure information, sketching initial ideas, generating detailed wireframe mockups, and using HTML and CSS markup to code content for browsers. Students will work both independently and collaboratively to accomplish a variety of exciting projects.

Our Faculty

  • Photo of Daniel Gries
    Daniel Gries
    Computer Science / Mathematics
    203.397.1001 x780
    Villanova - B.S.
    The Ohio State University - Ph.D.
    Holy Ghost Preparatory School, Bensalem PA
    Villanova University, The Ohio State University
  • Photo of Keri Matthews
    Keri Matthews
    Computer Science / Mathematics / Academic Support
    203.397.1001 x646
    Tufts University - B.A.
    UNH - M.S.